Author Archives: Armand D'Angour

About Armand D'Angour

Fellow and Tutor in Classics, Jesus College Oxford.

The Savoy Shower Principle

A few months ago, a friend and his wife won a weekend at the Savoy Hotel in a raffle. ‘It was a lovely experience’, said my friend. ‘They completely refurbished the hotel a few years ago, spent more than £200 million. … Continue reading

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In memoriam Martin West

The unexpected death (at the age of 77) on 13 July 2015 of Martin West, the greatest classicist of his generation,  has left a hole in the world of scholarship and philology. It also leaves me with a sense of profound … Continue reading

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Ovid, the Latin lover

Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Roman poet, born 20 March 43 BC Ovid’s Amores 1.5: the poet’s most upbeat erotic composition in translation. Midday: a long, hot afternoon ahead; I threw my weary body on the bed. The blinds, half-shut, half-open to … Continue reading

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Dura virum nutrix

Kate Bucknell, the novelist, was curious about the origin of Sedbergh School’s Latin motto Dura Virum Nutrix – ‘harsh nurse of men’ . She wrote to me: ‘I am working out a preoccupation of Auden’s, 1927ish, with the Latin motto, the harsh … Continue reading

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Failing at All Souls

In 1983 I received my Finals results, along with a note from Simon Hornblower, who had tutored me in Ancient History for a year, saying ‘Congratulations. Try for All Souls?’ I duly sat the exams for the All Souls Prize … Continue reading

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Losers and winners

Coming last in style The ancient Greeks didn’t always treat athletes and athletics with reverence. Nicarchus (1st cent. AD) wrote a witty epigram about runner called Kharmos (‘Victor’), which I’ve translated as follows: When Kharmos, in Arcadia, once entered in … Continue reading

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A woman at the Olympics

KALLIPATEIRA                     by Loréntsos Mavílis (1860-1912) “O noble Rhodian lady, how come you here, explain! By ancient custom, women are barred from this domain.” “I have a nephew, Eukles, who won Olympic fame. My father, son, three brothers, are honoured for the same.   … Continue reading

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